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1931-1932- 



THE 

Curtis Institute of Music 




Catalogue 

1931-1932 



RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

WAS CREATED IN I914 

UNDER AN ENDOWMENT 

BY 

MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

IS OPERATED 

UNDER A CHARTER 

OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 

AND 

IS ACCREDITED 

BY THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

FOR THE TRAINING OF NON QUOTA 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 



A letter from the Commissioner General of Immigration to 
The Curtis Institute of Music states: 

"It gives me pleasure to advise that your school 
has been duly approved by the Secretary of Labor 
as an institution of learning for immigrant stu- 
dents, in accordance with the Immigration Act of 
1914. The Department of State has been notified 
of this action for transmission of the information 
to all American consular officers, who will then be 
in a position to consider applications for the re- 
quired non quota student visas." 

(signed*) Harry E. Hull 
Commissioner General 




MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

Founder and President 




JOSEF HOFMANN, Director 



PURPOSE 



TO HAND DOWN 

THROUGH CONTEMPORARY MASTERS 

THE GREAT TRADITIONS OF THE PAST 



TO TEACH STUDENTS TO BUILD 

ON THIS HERITAGE FOR 

THE FUTURE 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
OFFERS TO STUDENTS 

Instruction by world-famous artists who give individual 
lessons 

Free tuition 

Financial aid, when warranted 

Steinway grand pianos, string and wind instruments rent 
free, when deserving 

Opportunities to attend concerts of the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra and performances of the Philadelphia Grand Opera 
Company, as part of their musical education 

When Warranted by Their Progress 

Participation as soloists in performances of the Philadelphia 
Grand Opera Company, which is affiliated with The Curtis 
Institute of Music 

Participation as soloists, members of ensemble groups, or 
members of the Curtis Orchestra, in concerts which are 
given in Philadelphia, its suburbs and other communities, 
and in radio concerts which are broadcast from Casimir 
Hall over the Columbia Broadcasting System 

Upon Satisfactory Completion of Their Studies 

Financial assistance to the Curtis graduate of exceptional 
achievement in launching him upon a public career 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT 

Richard Copley, New York 

The Curtis Institute Concert Bureau, Philadelphia 



I 91 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OFFICERS 

President 
Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

Vice-President 
Philip S. Collins 

Secretary 
Cary William Bok 

Treasurer 
William Curtis Bok 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

Mrs. Samuel S. Fels Cyrus H. K. Curtis 

Philip S. Collins William Curtis Bok 

Cary William Bok 



ii 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EXECUTIVE STAFF 

JOSEF HOFMANN 

Director 

Henry Bellamann Dean 

W. Creary Woods .... Executive Secretary 

Margaret H. Benkert Registrar 

Emily L. McCallip .... Student Counselor 

Marjorie Winn Librarian 

H. W. Eastman Comptroller 

Emil Raymond Publicity 



iz 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE FACULTY 



MUSICAL 



Aronoff, Max 
Bachmann, Edwin 
Bailly, Louis 
Barber, Samuel 
Barclay, John 
Bimboni, Alberto 
Bonade, Daniel 
Brees, Anton 
Chasins, Abram 
Cohen, Sol 
Connell, Horatio 
Coryell, Marian 
Deak, Stephen 
de gogorza, emilio 
del Negro, Ferdinand 
de montoliu, placido 
Donatelli, Philip 
Drummond, Ethel 
Fonaroff, Vera 
Fox, Earl 
Frantz, Florence 
Gerhard, Charles 
Germani, Fernando 
Guetter, Walter 
Halbwachs, Martha 
Harms, William 
Hilsberg, Alexander 
Hofmann, Josef 
Horner, Anton 
Kaufman, Harry 
Kincaid, William 
Krinsky, Yvonne 
Lawrence, Lucile 
Levin, Sylvan 



Luboshutz, Lea 
Mario, Queen a 
Meiff, Albert 
Meredith, Eleanor 
Mertens, Georges 

MlQUELLE, RENEE LoNGY 
MUNZ, MlECZYSLAW 

Nazarevitch, Xenia 
Paget, Ethel 
Pons, Max 
Poska, Judith 
Reiner, Fritz 
Resnikoff, Vera 
Riedel, Karl 
Rybner-Barclay, Dagmar 
S almond, Felix 
Salzedo, Carlos 
Saperton, David 
Saumelle, Minna 
scalero, rosario 
Schwar, Oscar 
Sembrich, Marcella 
Soffray, Anne-Marie 
Svecenski, Claire 
Tabuteau, Marcel 
Thompson, Oscar 
Torello, Anton 
van Emden, Harriet 
Vengerova, Isabelle 
von Wymetal, Eric 
von Wymetal, Jr., Wilhelm 
Westmoreland, Elizabeth 
Zechiel, Ernest 
Zimbalist, Efrem 



ACADEMIC 



Beck, Jean B. 

Daudon, Rene 

de montoliu, placido 

Fernberger, Samuel W. 

Gregory, Eufemia Giannini 

Harbeson, William Page 

King, Samuel Arthur 



Lenrow, Elbert 
Nichols, Roy F. 
Shumway, Mary 
Summers, Helen 
Turk, Martha 
Wehr, Mentzer 
Wesner, Mary B. 



I 13 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 





STUDIES 


Accompanying 
Campanology 


Contrabassoon 

French Horn 

Trumpet 

Trombone 

Tuba 

Percussion 

Organ 

Physical Education 


Chamber Music and 
Ensemble Playing 

Conducting 


Criticism, Professional 
eurhythmics 


Fencing 
History: 

General 

American Cultural 


Pianoforte: 
Grade A 
Grade B 

Platform Deportment 


Harp 

History of Music 

Languages, Literature 
and Diction: 


Psychology 
Rhythmic Movements 
Science, Introduction to 


English 
French 


Theory and Composition: 


German 
Italian 
Latin 
Spanish 

Literature, Comparatve 


Composition 

Elements and Forms of Musical 

Expression 
Instrumentation and 

Orchestration 


Operatic Acting and 
Stage Deportment 


Solfege 
Dictation 


Operatic Coaching and 
Repertoire 


Harmony- 
Counterpoint 



Orchestra Playing: 
Violin 
Viola 

Violoncello 
Double Bass 
Flute 
Clarinet 
Oboe 

English Horn 
Bassoon 



Chamber Music Score Reading 
Orchestra Score Reading 

Viola 

Violin 

Violoncello 

Voice 



I Ml 





QUEENA MARIO 



EMILIO de GOGORZA 




MARCELLA SEMBRICH 





HARRIET van EMDEN 



HORATIO CONNELL 




DAGMAR RYBNER-BARCLAY 




MAX PONS 






THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION I 



Voice 



Instructors 

Marcella Sembrich Emilio de Gogorza 

Queena Mario Harriet van Emden 

Horatio Connell 



Coaching and Repertoire 

Harry Kaufman 

Max Pons 

Dagmar Rybner-Barclay 



Diction 

John Barclay 
Rene Daudon 
Placido de Montoliu 

EuFEMIA GlANNINI GREGORY 



Samuel Arthur King 
Minna Saumelle 
Mary Shumway 
Martha Turk 



1 17 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



MARCELLA SEMBRICH 

Born Kochanska, in Lemberg, Poland, and destined to be- 
come one of the world's greatest sopranos, Marcella Sembrich 
adopted her mother's maiden name for her professional 
career. 

At the age of five Marcella received her first musical in- 
struction, from her father, in piano and violin, and at eleven 
she entered the Lemberg Conservatory to study the piano 
with Guillaume Stengel, violin with Bruchmann, and har- 
mony with Mikuli. Several years later, in Vienna, while 
studying piano with Julius Epstein and violin with Helmes- 
berger, her great possibilities as a singer were discovered, 
and the young girl was then sent to Milan to study voice 
with Lamperti. 

Marcella Sembrich's debut as singer was made in Athens, 
in 1877, and success in opera came swiftly. Engagements in 
London, Paris, Dresden, Berlin, St. Petersburg (Leningrad), 
Vienna and Madrid followed in quick succession, and in 1883 
she was engaged as leading soprano of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company of New York, making her American debut 
as "Lucia". Thereafter, visits to the United States were 
interspersed with concert tours and operatic engagements in 
Europe, while from 1901 to 1909 she was continuously en- 
gaged by the Metropolitan Opera Company. 

Since retiring from the operatic and concert stage, Madame 
Sembrich has devoted herself to teaching, in which field she 
has met with much renown, having developed such singers 
as Jeritza, Giannini, Lashanska and Mario. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EMILIO de GOGORZA 

Emilio de Gogorza was born of Spanish- American parents 
in Brooklyn, New York. In England, he undertook singing 
as a serious study and continued his studies at the Bcole 
Monge and the Lycee Louis-le-Grand in Paris. He made 
his first appearance on the concert stage in France. 

Returning to America, the young singer studied with 
Moderati and Agramonte in New York. Later, a visit to 
Paris resulted in his becoming a pupil of the famous £mile 
Bourgeois, singing master of the Opera Comique. 

In 1897 Emilio de Gogorza was heard in a concert in 
New York with Marcella Sembrich. Since then his ap- 
pearances have been continuous both in recitals and with 
the leading orchestras in the United States and Europe. 



QUEENA MARIO 

Queena Mario, a native of Akron, Ohio, received her first 
musical training in Plainfield, New Jersey. Winning a 
scholarship at the National Conservatory of Music in New 
York, she undertook the serious study of the piano. She 
first studied voice with Oscar Saenger, continuing with him 
for three years. During this time she contributed articles to 
the New York newspapers. 

After becoming a pupil of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
and studying with that famous artiste for three years, 
Miss Mario made her operatic debut as "Juliet" in "Romeo 
and Juliet " given by the San Carlo Opera Company. In 
1911 she was engaged by Antonio Scotti for his transcon- 
tinental opera tour, and in the following year she became a 
member of the Ravinia Opera Company and of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company of New York, with which com- 
panies she is still associated. 



I 19 I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HARRIET van EMDEN 

Harriet van Emden was born in Milwaukee. At an early 
age she came to New York and enrolled as a vocal student 
at the Institute of Musical Art, later going to Berlin to study 
with Vittorino Moratti. In 1917 she was accepted as a 
pupil by Madame Marcella Sembrich, with whom Miss van 
Emden studied until making her debut in 1911 in New York 
City. 

During that season Miss van Emden appeared exten- 
sively in recitals in this country and the following year made 
her European debut, in Amsterdam, as soloist with the 
Concertgebouw Orchestra under the conductorship of Willem 
Mengelberg. Since then she has appeared as soloist with 
symphony orchestras in the Eastern and Western Hemi- 
spheres. 

HORATIO CONNELL 

Horatio Connell was born in Philadelphia, and had his first 
instruction there with Emil Gastel. He completed his 
studies at Frankfurt-on-Main, Germany, under Julius Stock- 
hausen, a pupil of Manuel Garcia. 

Mr. Connell made his debut at Queens Hall with the 
London Symphony Orchestra in 1905 and thereafter made 
most successful tours of Germany and Great Britain, where 
he was recognized as one of the foremost oratorio singers. 

Having spent nine years abroad in study and concertizing, 
Mr. Connell returned to the United States in 1909, and has 
since been heard in recitals and at most of the important 
music festivals throughout the country. He has also ap- 
peared as soloist with the leading symphony orchestras in 
this country and abroad. 

f 2LO 1 





ISABELLE VENGEROVA 



DAVID SAPERTON 







*%* 







JOSEF HOFMANN 





MIECZYSLAW MUNZ 



ABRAM CHASINS 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION II 

Pianoforte 

GRADE A 

Instructors 
Josef Hofmann Isabelle Vengerova 

David Saperton Florence Frantz 

(Assistant to Mr. Hofman) (Assistant to Mme. Vengerova) 

MlECZYSLAW MlJNZ 

GRADE B 

Instructor 
Abram Chasins 

Assistants 

Ethel S. Drummond Marian Coryell 

Claire Svecenski 

and others, drawn from the student 
body of the institute 



The Steinway is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



2-3 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



JOSEF HOFMANN 

His father a teacher, pianist-composer and orchestra leader 
of repute, and his mother a noted soprano of the Cracow Mu- 
nicipal Opera, Josef Hofmann's heritage was a musical one. 
At four years of age he had already begun the study of the 
piano. His sister was his first teacher and after a year of in- 
struction the boy came under his father's tutelage. 

When five years old, Josef Hofmann made his first public 
appearance, playing in a town near Warsaw. Other con- 
certs followed, in the leading cities of Poland. At eight the 
youthful prodigy was heard by Anton Rubinstein who pre- 
dicted for him a career of exceptional brilliance. In his 
ninth year the boy pianist played in Germany, France, Eng- 
land and Scandinavia, and in 1887 appeared for the first time 
in the United States. He gave forty concerts and his re- 
markable playing aroused the enthusiasm of Alfred Corning 
Clark, of New York, who generously offered to provide the 
means for the furthering of the eleven-year-old boy's musical 
education and artistic growth. Thereupon the young Josef 
returned to Europe and studied in Berlin. In 1891, four 
years later, he became the pupil of Anton Rubinstein. 

In 1894 the eighteen-year-old youth returned to the concert 
platform, touring Germany and England. He made his 
Russian debut in 1896 and two years later again toured the 
United States. Since that time Josef Hofmann has been 
constantly before the public as a concert pianist. 

His compositions are numerous. His orchestra works 
have been performed in the United States and Europe by 
Nikisch, Schuch, Safonoff, Stokowski, Zach, Gabrilowitsch, 
Damrosch and Stock. 



M 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DAVID SAPERTON 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, David Saperton began 
the study of piano at the age of six, under the guidance of his 
grandfather, an internationally-known tenor and musician. 
Mr. Saperton's father, a graduate physician of the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, was also a basso of repute. At the age of 
ten, David Saperton made his first public appearance with 
the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and at fifteen made his 
New York debut in a recital, appearing soon after as soloist 
at one of the Metropolitan Opera House Sunday concerts. 
He then went to Europe and, in 1908, made his Berlin debut 
in a joint recital with Geraldine Farrar, following this with 
successful appearances throughout Europe and in the United 
States. 

Of late Mr. Saperton has been devoting his time to 
teaching. 

ISABELLE VENGEROVA 

A native of Vilna, Russia, Madame Isabelle Vengerova is a 
descendant of a family widely known in the Russian literary 
world. At an early age she was sent to the Vienna Con- 
servatory to study the piano with Josef Dachs. She later 
became a pupil of Leschetizky. 

Returning to Russia she continued her studies at the St. 
Petersburg Conservatory with Madame Essipoffand was soon 
named her assistant. In 1910, by the unanimous vote of a 
faculty which included Auer and LiadofF, she was elected 
Professor of Pianoforte under the direction of Glazounoff 
and held this position for twelve years. 

She has been a member of the piano faculty of The Curtis 
Institute since its foundation. Madame Vengerova has 
appeared in concerts in the principal musical centers of 
Europe and America. 

1 15 3 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



MIECZYSLAW MUNZ 

Of Polish nativity, Mieczyslaw Miinz's musical talent early 
made itself manifest. At the age of three the child began to 
play by ear the folk songs of his country. His first training, 
received in Cracow, the town of his birth, was followed by a 
course of instruction at the Vienna Conservatory under 
Professor Lalewicz, and later by study as one of the group of 
which Busoni was the center, in Berlin. A young man of 
twenty, Mr. Miinz made his debut in Berlin, appearing as 
soloist with the Berlin Symphony Orchestra. Since then 
he has concertized extensively in Europe, the United States, 
Australia and the Orient, and has played under the batons 
of many famous conductors. 

ABRAM CHASINS 

Abram Chasins was born in New York. He began to study 
music at six with Bertha Tapper. Soon afterward he won a 
scholarship at the Institute of Musical Art and later was ac- 
cepted as a pupil by Richard Epstein. Between the ages of 
sixteen and twenty he received private instruction from 
Ernest Hutcheson and for the following two years continued 
his lessons with Mr. Hutcheson at the Juilliard Graduate 
School, where he was awarded a fellowship in piano. 
Chasins was also successful in winning a fellowship in compo- 
sition at the same school and pursued this study with Rubin 
Goldmark. From 192.6 to 192.9 he studied piano with Josef 
Hofmann at The Curtis Institute of Music. 

Mr. Chasins has composed many works for piano, and for 
violin, violoncello and voice, a number of which have been 
performed by prominent artists here and abroad. His sym- 
phonic works have been played by the Philadelphia Sym- 
phony Orchestra under Gabrilowitsch and by the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra of New York under Toscanini. 

If 2.6! 




EFREM ZIMBALIST 



VERA FONAROFF 





EDWIN BACHMANN 



ALBERT MEIFF 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION III 

Violin 

Instructors 
Efrem Zimbalist Lea Luboshutz 

Vera Fonaroff Edwin Bachmann 

Albert Meiff Judith Poska 

(Assistant to Mme. Luboshutz) 



2-9! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Known throughout the musical world as one of the most 
brilliant of concert violinists, Efrem Zimbalist displayed as a 
child the genius that was to bring him future renown. At 
the age of nine he was appointed first violinist of the orches- 
tra at the Opera House in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, his birth- 
place. Soon after, he was accepted as a pupil by Professor 
Auer at the Imperial Conservatory of Music, in Petrograd. 

In 191 1, when he made his American debut, the principal 
cities of Europe had already acclaimed him as one of the 
world's greatest violinists. Since then, Mr. Zimbalist has 
made several concert tours around the world. He has com- 
posed music for violin, piano and voice and has successful 
light operas to his credit. 

L£A LUBOSHUTZ 

Lea Luboshutz was born in Odessa, and began her concert 
career as a violinist at the age of six. Upon the advice of 
Vassily SafonofF, noted Russian conductor, she pursued her 
studies at the Moscow Conservatory, where he was director. 
There she was awarded a gold medal and, at the age of six- 
teen, was heard in recitals in Poland, Germany, and France. 
She appeared also as soloist with orchestras under the con- 
ductorship of SafonofF and Arthur Nikisch, following this 
with concerts in America and tours of European countries. 

Madame Luboshutz later studied for three years with 
Eugene Ysaye and became one of his most brilliant pupils. 
Since then she has appeared extensively in concerts and as 
soloist with leading orchestras, both in the United States 
and abroad. 



30 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



VERA FONAROFF 

Vera Fonaroff, born in Russia, began to study the violin 
when she was seven with Mark Fonaroff in New York City, 
and two years later appeared as soloist at a Sunday concert 
with the Metropolitan Opera House Orchestra. After mak- 
ing frequent appearances as a child, she was sent to England 
to study with Dr. Adolph Brodsky at the Royal Manchester 
College of Music, and five years later was awarded a Diploma 
with Distinction as artiste and teacher. Vera Fonaroff 
toured England extensively, playing both in recitals and with 
the important symphony orchestras; she also participated in 
the Ancoats Brotherhood Concerts in conjunction with the 
lecture-recitals given by Bernard Shaw, and later studied 
with Franz Kneisel. 

Since 1908 Madame Fonaroff has made several transcon- 
tinental tours and, following in the footsteps of her dis- 
tinguished husband, the late Mark Fonaroff, she has become 
a well-known pedagogue. 

EDWIN BACHMANN 

Edwin Bachmann was born in Budapest and received his 
earliest musical training from his parents. Later he attended 
the Budapest Conservatory and the Budapest Royal Academy. 
His first instructors in violin were Barre and the famous 
pedagogue Alois Gobbi. 

At the age of fifteen Edwin Bachmann made his debut, as 
soloist with the Budapest State Symphony Orchestra. Two 
years later he was engaged by the same Orchestra as concert 
master. 

Continuing his studies the young man was accepted as a 
chamber music student by David Popper. 

Mr. Bachmann was a member of the Russian Symphony and 
the New York Symphony Orchestras besides being with the 
Letz Quartet for seven years and with the Elman Quartet 
during its existence. He has toured South America and the 
United States. 

[31I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION IV 

Viola and Chamber Music 

Instructor 
Dr. Louis Bailly 

Assistant 
Max Aronoff 



DIVISION V 

Violoncello 

Instructor 
Felix Salmond 

Assistant 
Stephen Deak 



^ 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 




DR. LOUIS BAILLY 

A native of Valenciennes, France, Louis Bailly, at the age of 
seventeen, won first prize for viola playing at the Paris Con- 
servatoire. He soon gained a reputation as soloist, playing 
with the Concerts Colonne, the Societe des Concerts du 
Conservatoire, and other larger orchestras. 

Having decided upon a career as chamber music artist, 
Louis Bailly became a founder-member of the famous Capet 
Quartet. From this organization he passed to the Geloso 
Quartet and later he became a member of the Flonzaley and 
Elman Quartets. He has appeared as soloist with the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the St. Louis 
Orchestra, the National Symphony under Bodansky, and 
with the Friends of Music, New York City. 

On May 2.1, 1930 he received the honorary degree of Doc- 
tor of Music and he has been a member of the Jury of the Paris 
Conservatoire since 192.0. 



I 33 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 




FELIX SALMOND 

A musical endowment was the birthright of this violon- 
cellist. His father was Normand Salmond, the celebrated 
English bass-baritone, his mother a professional pianist. 

Felix Salmond was born in London. There his gifts were 
developed under the tutelage of Professor W. E. Whitehouse 
of the Royal College of Music. Later, in Brussels, the young 
man continued his studies with Edouard Jacobs. 

In 1909 Mr. Salmond made his debut, in London, and after- 
wards he appeared in concerts throughout Great Britain. 

His debut on the Continent, in 192.1, was followed in the 
succeeding year by his first concert appearance in the United 
States. 

In frequent tours of the United States and Europe, Felix 
Salmond is now appearing in concerts with the most cele- 
brated pianists of the day, and as soloist with the leading 
orchestras. 



I 34 




HARRY KAUFMAN 





ELIZABETH WESTMORELAND 



YVONNE KRINSKY 




EARL FOX 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION VI 

Accompanying 

Harry Kaufman 
Instructor 

and 

Official Accompanist of the Institute 



Other Accompanists 

Elizabeth Westmoreland 

Yvonne Krinsky 

Earl Fox 

and others, drawn from the student 
body of the institute 



f 37 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HARRY KAUFMAN 

Harry Kaufman was born in New York City, of Russian 
parentage. At the early age of ten he was vocal soloist and 
choir leader in the principal synagogues of that city. 

When twelve years of age he commenced his piano lessons 
with Gottfried Kritzler at the New York College of Music, 
and at fifteen he became the pupil of Sigismond Stojowski, 
later continuing his studies with Josef Hofmann. 

Mr. Kaufman has appeared as soloist and assisting artist 
with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia 
Orchestras respectively, and has also been heard in numerous 
solo recitals. His linguistic abilities and wide acquaintance 
with violin, 'cello and chamber music, as well as vocal litera- 
ture, have made Mr. Kaufman much in demand as an artist- 
accompanist. 

He has toured with Efrem Zimbalist, Carl Flesch, Lea 
Luboshutz, Toscha Seidel, Arthur Hartmann, Theodore 
Spiering, Miron Poliaken, Felix Salmond, Louis Bailly, Alma 
Gluck, Charlotte Lund, Erica Morini, the late George 
Hamlin, and other artists of prominence. 



I3 8 l 





CARLOS SALZEDO 



LUCILE LAWRENCE 





FERNANDO GERMANI 



ANTON BREES 




OSCAR THOMPSON 




PLACIDO DE MONTOLIU 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION VII 

Harp 

Instructor 
Carlos Salzedo 

Assistant 
Lucile Lawrence 

DIVISION VIII 

Organ 

Instructor 
Fernando Germani 

DIVISION IX 

Campanology 

Instructor 
Anton Brees 

DIVISION X 

Professional Criticism 

Instructor 
Oscar Thompson 

The Curtis Institute of Music uses Lyon and Healy harps exclusively. 
The organ is an Aeolian four-manual. 

The carillon consists of a set of seventy-one bells ranging in weight from seven pounds to 
eleven tons, cast by Taylor and Company, of Loughborough, England. 

I 4* 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CARLOS SALZEDO 

Carlos Salzedo, who has elevated the harp to a position of 
undisputed popularity, was born in the province of Gironde, 
France, and entered the Bordeaux Conservatory at the age of 
seven. In two years he had won first prizes in piano and 
solfege. Thence he went to the Paris Conservatory where, 
at the age of twelve, he began the study of the harp and four 
years later won the first prizes for both piano and harp. 

Until he was twenty Carlos Salzedo toured Europe both as 
pianist and harpist, and only when Gatti-Casazza engaged 
him in 1909 as solo harpist with the Metropolitan Opera 
did Mr. Salzedo finally determine the harp should fashion 
his career. As harpist he has since toured America and 
Europe extensively. 

Mr. Salzedo organized the Harp Ensemble which bears 
his name and with Edgar Varese formed the International 
Composers' Guild. Mr. Salzedo is President of the National 
Association of Harpists and an editor of "Eolus", its publi- 
cation. His "Modem Study of the Harp" is the recognized 
textbook for harp study. 

Carlos Salzedo's compositions and transcriptions are 
numerous. His symphonic works have been played by the 
Symphony Orchestras of New York, Chicago, Detroit, Phila- 
delphia, Boston, Cleveland and Cincinnati. 



I 42. 5 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FERNANDO GERMANI 

A native of Rome, Fernando Germani, at the age of three, 
began his study of music at the Royal Conservatory of Saint 
Cecelia. He studied piano, composition and organ, with 
Bajardi, Respighi and Manari, and was graduated at a 
youthful age. 

When fifteen he was appointed official organist of the 
Augusteo Orchestra, which position he has held for ten 
years. He took part in many performances under Bernardino 
Molinari and other celebrated conductors, and also played 
with various other symphony orchestras. 

In 1918 Fernando Germani made his American debut. 
Besides playing on the Wanamaker organs in New York and 
Philadelphia, and with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 
Mr. Germani's concert tours in the Western Hemisphere 
have carried him to the Pacific coast, and from Canada to 
the Gulf of Mexico. 

In 192.9, then twenty-three years of age, Mr. Germani was 
made head of the Organ Department of the Royal Con- 
servatory of Saint Cecelia in Rome, and High Commissioner 
of Examinations for organ and organ composition for the 
Royal Academy of Saint Cecelia. 



C43 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ANTON BREES 

Acknowledged as one of the master carillonneurs of the 
world, Anton Brees possesses the distinction of having in- 
troduced the Flemish carillon art into the United States and 
South Africa. He is a graduate of the Royal Flemish Con- 
servatory of Antwerp and holds the positions of bellmaster 
at the Mountain Lake Singing Tower, Mountain Lake, 
Florida, and at Christ Church, Cranbrook, Bloomfield Hills, 
Michigan. 

A Belgian by birth, Mr. Brees was trained for his profession 
by his father, Gustaaf Brees, organist emeritus of the Ant- 
werp Cathedral and city carillonneur in Antwerp. 

His fame spreading rapidly in Belgium, Holland and Ire- 
land, Anton Brees was chosen in 1913 to give recitals on the 
War Memorial Carillon in Loughborough, England, where 
he met with great success. In the spring of 1914 he made his 
first visit to America, giving recitals in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama; Andover and Gloucester, Massachusetts; and Morris- 
town, New Jersey. 

In 19215 Mr. Brees opened the Cape Town Carillon in South 
Africa in the presence of the Prince of Wales and in the same 
year the Rockefeller Memorial Carillon of the Park Avenue 
Baptist Church, New York City. He presided as bellmaster 
at the opening of the carillons at the following places: 
Mercersburg Academy, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania; First 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Germantown, Philadelphia; 
Saint Chrysostom's Church, Chicago; Princeton University, 
Princeton, New Jersey; First Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Springfield, Massachusetts; Christ Church, Cranbrook, 
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; Mountain Lake Singing Tower, 
Mountain Lake, Florida, on the occasion of its dedication by 
President Coolidge; Scottish Rite Cathedral, Indianapolis; 
and Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. 



I 44! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OSCAR THOMPSON 

Oscar Thompson was born in Crawford ville, Indiana, the 
son of Will Henry Thompson who wrote the battle poem 
"High Tide at Gettysburg ", and the nephew of the novelist, 
essayist, poet and literary critic, Maurice Thompson. 

Two lines of endeavor have engaged Oscar Thompson's 
life-long attention, for while he took up newspaper work 
before he was twenty and has since had every form of 
journalistic experience, he also continued his study of music, 
begun at an early age. 

During the World War Mr. Thompson was an officer in 
the General Staff of the United States Army, assigned to the 
Military Intelligence Division. 

Besides being music critic of the New York Evening Post 
and an associate editor of Musical America, Mr. Thompson 
has contributed to Musical Quarterly, Modem Music, Musical 
Times (London), The Spectator (London) and Sackbut 
(London), as well as to many other American, English and 
continental publications. 



H45l 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EURHYTHMICS 

Instructor 
PLACIDO de MONTOLIU 

A native of Tarragona, in Catalonia, Placido de Montoliu's 
education began, naturally, in Spain. He received a Bache- 
lor of Arts degree at St. Ignatius of Loyola College, in 
Barcelona, and began his musical education at the Academia 
Granados, in the same city, continuing in Geneva, at the 
Conservatoire and at the Jaques-Dalcroze Institute, having in 
the meantime been graduated from the College of Infantry 
at Toledo, becoming a lieutenant in the Spanish Army. 
He also attended the Jaques-Dalcroze Institute in Hellerau, 
Germany, from which he was graduated. 

For three years Mr. de Montoliu was then assistant to 
Professor Jaques-Dalcroze, in Hellerau, and later, having 
come to the United States, was for nine years an instructor in 
Eurythmics, Solfege and Choral Singing at Bryn Mawr 
College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, and for two years a 
teacher of rhythmic and plastic dancing at Madame Yvette 
Guilbert's School of Theatre Arts in New York City. He 
was also connected with Madame Guilbert's school in Paris 
for two years. In Paris likewise Mr. de Montoliu was for 
three years director of the rhythmic ballet at the Theatre 
National de l'Opera. 

Mr. de Montoliu is the creator of ballets on Giuseppe 
San Martini's Concerto in G Major for String Orchestra, and 
Philippe Gaubert's "Fresques" , also incidental dances in 
Massenet's "Griselidis" and Ernest Reyer's opera, "Sigurd" , 
all of which were given at the Theatre National de l'Opera. 



[46] 





ERNEST ZECHIEL 



RENEE LONGY MIQUELLE 




ROSARIO SCALERO 





ANNE-MARIE SOFFRAY 



ELEANOR MEREDITH 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DIVISION XI 



Theory and Composition 



ROSARIO SCALERO 

Instructor in Composition 
Instrumentation and Orchestration 



Ernest Zechiel 

Instructor in Elementary Counterpoint 
and Elementary Harmony 



Instructors in Solfege 

Renee Longy Miquelle 

Anne-Marie Soffray 

Eleanor Meredith 



49 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ROSARIO SCALERO 

Rosario Scalero, who is recognized as a great authority on 
theory and composition, began his musical career as a 
violinist at the Liceo Musicale in Turin. Later he studied 
with Camillo Sivori in Genoa and August Wilhelmj in 
London. At the early age of twenty, Mr. Scalero won the 
title of Distinguished Academician of the Royal Academy 
of St. Cecilia in Rome. 

Mr. Scalero's love for theory and composition led him to 
study for seven years with the master Mandyczewski who 
was one of the most intimate associates of Brahms and the 
editor of Schubert's and Haydn's complete works. There- 
after, Mr. Scalero was appointed Docent of Musical Form 
at the Royal Academy of St. Cecilia. 

After a series of concerts in the principal cities of Europe 
in which Mr. Scalero appeared as a violinist, he settled in 
Rome and there founded the Societa del Quartetto for the 
performance of ensemble and choral works. 

Mr. Scalero has also acted as High Commissioner for 
Examinations for the Conservatories of Naples, Rome and 
Parma. His works are numerous and include compositions 
for violin, piano and orchestra. 



I5°l 





WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 



SYLVAN LEVIN 




f* 



<?* 





KARL RIEDEL 



GEORGES MERTENS 





ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



MARCEL TABUTEAU 





MAX ARONOFF 



STEPHEN DEAR 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF OPERA 

Fritz Reiner 

Head of Department 

WlLHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

Stage Director 
Instructor in Operatic Acting 

Eric von Wymetal 
Assistant 

Coaches 

Alberto Bimboni Sylvan Levin 

Karl Riedel Georges Mertens 

Elizabeth Westmoreland 



CONCERT STAGE DEPORTMENT 

Instructor 
Samuel Arthur King 



I 53 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF ORCHESTRA 

Fritz Reiner 

Conductor of The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

Instructor of Conducting 

and Orchestra Classes 

Sylvan Levin 
Assistant Conductor 

Instructors of Orchestra Playing 

Alexander Hilsberg 

Marcel Tabuteau 



Instructors of Instruments 

Violin, Albert Meiff Oboe, Marcel Tabuteau* 

Violin, Alexander Hilsberg* Bassoon, Walter Guetter* 

Viola, Max Aronoff Contrabassoon, Ferdinand del Negro* 

Violoncello, Stephen Deak Horn, Anton Horner* 

Double Bass, Anton Torello* Trumpet, Sol Cohen* 

Flute, William M. Kincaid* Trombone, Charles Gerhard* 

Clarinet, Daniel Bonade Tuba, Philip A. Donatelli* 

Percussion, Oscar Schwar* 



Librarian and Orchestra Management 
Charles Demarest 



* Members of the Philadelphia Orchestra 



H541 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FRITZ REINER 

Fritz Reiner was born in Budapest, and studied at the 
National Academy of Music under Thoman and Koessler. 

He has been repetiteur for the Komischer Opera, in Buda- 
pest, conductor of the Leibach Municipal Opera, and in 
Dresden for a period of eight years conductor of the Dresden 
Opera and the Dresden State Orchestra. 

In Rome in the year 19x1 Fritz Reiner conducted, as guest, 
the first performance of "Die Me ister singer" ever given in the 
Teatro Costanzi, and some of the concerts of the Augusteo 
Orchestra. 

In the same year Mr. Reiner made his first appearance in 
the United States, becoming the successor of the late Eugene 
Ysaye as conductor of the Cincinnati Orchestra, which 
position Mr. Reiner held until the end of the season 1930- 
193 1, resigning then to become a conductor of the Phila- 
delphia Grand Opera Company. 

During the period of his engagement by the Cincinnati 
Orchestra, Mr. Reiner also conducted some of the concerts 
at the Lewisohn Stadium in New York and in the winter 
of 192.7-19x8 was guest conductor of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra. 



55 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Wilhelm von Wymetal the younger is a graduate of the 
Vienna Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art. As an 
actor, he started his career in Vienna, his home city, and 
continued in Berlin. Later he specialized in operatic stage 
directing, and became connected with the Leipzig and Vienna 
Opera. Called to the Metropolitan Opera Company of 
New York in 192.7 he, in co-operation with his father, 
Wilhelm von Wymetal, staged many of the important works 
of that organization. 

Since being released by Mr. Gatti Casazza in the summer 
of 192.9, Mr. von Wymetal, Jr., has been Stage Director of 
the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company. 

ALBERTO BIMBONI 

Alberto Bimboni was born in Florence, one of a large 
family of musicians. He studied piano, organ and com- 
position and at the age of sixteen conducted his first orchestral 
composition. Two years later he made his debut as operatic 
director. 

Mr. Bimboni organized the Society of Popular Orchestral 
Concerts and was its conductor for four years, the inaugural 
concert being given with Busoni and Ysaye as soloists. 
In 191 1 Mr. Bimboni toured the United States, conducting, 
with Giorgio Polacco, Puccini's "Girl of the Golden West" . 
He has been associated with a number of opera companies, 
among which were the Hammerstein, the Boston, and the 
Philadelphia Operatic Society, as conductor, and is himself 
the composer of two operas. In June 1930 he was made 
Director of the Orpheus Club of Philadelphia. 



[56] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DR. KARL RIEDEL 

Karl Riedel was born in Vienna. He studied organ with 
Anton Bruckner, counterpoint and composition with Robert 
Fuchs, and conducting with Gustav Mahler. ' His first en- 
gagement was that of conductor at the State Theatre in Linz. 

With the Viennese Opera Ensemble as conductor from 
1909 through 191 1 he toured Bulgaria and Rumania, also 
visiting Constantinople, Smyrna, Cairo and Athens. Dur- 
ing the next four years he conducted all the operas at the 
Hamburg State Theatre. He then was for six years with 
the Royal Opera at Stuttgart. 

In 192.2. Dr. Riedel came to the United States to accept an 
engagement with the Metropolitan Opera Company of New 
York, with which company he has remained until the pres- 
ent time. 

Karl Riedel has the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy and 
Doctor of Musicology. 

GEORGES MERTENS 

The son of Joseph Mertens, composer, inspector of Belgian 
music schools, and Director of the French Royal Theatre of 
The Hague, Georges Mertens' artistic heritage led him to 
abandon the study of the law after having been graduated 
from the University of Brussels and to devote himself to 
music. He studied the organ, harmony and counterpoint, 
and took up singing with Seguin, whom he later assisted at 
the Liege Conservatory. 

After one year's experience as coach at the Lyons Theatre, 
Mr. Mertens was engaged by the Theatre de la Monnaie in 
Brussels. During his long term of service at this theatre 
he coached, among others, John Charles Thomas. 

In recognition of his work in connection with the produc- 
tion of numerous French works at the Theatre de la Mon- 
naie, Mr. Mertens was elected officer of the French Academy 
(Institute of France.) 

I57l 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

HISTORY 

Roy F. Nichols, A.M., Ph.D. 

(Professor of History at the 
University of Pennsylvania) 

HISTORY OF MUSIC 

Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

(Professor of Romance Languages 

and Literature 

Lecturer — History of Music at 

the University of Pennsylvania) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Samuel W. Fernberger, Ph.D. 

(Professor of Psychology at the 
University of Pennsylvania) 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND 
ENGLISH LITERATURE 

William Page Harbeson, LL.B., Ph.D. 

(Professor of English Literature at 
the University of Pennsylvania) 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Elbert Lenrow, A.M. 

(Special Instructor at the 
Oak Lane Country Day School) 

INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE 

Mentzer Wehr, A.M. 

(Assistant in Physics at 
Haverford College) 

I58I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LANGUAGES 

English 

Mary B. Wesner, A.B. 
Helen Summers 

French 
Rene Daudon 

German 

Mary Shumway, Ph.D. 

Martha Turk 

Italian 
EUFEMIA GlANNINI GREGORY 

Latin 
Mary B. Wesner, A.B. 

Spanish 
Placido de Montoliu 



Tutor 
Mary B. Wesner, A.B. 



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1 63 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CHAMBER MUSIC, ORCHESTRA PLAYING, 

ACCOMPANYING, OPERA, CAMPANOLOGY 

AND PROFESSIONAL CRITICISM 



CHAMBER MUSIC 

The purpose of this Division is to provide advanced 
students with the necessary experience in chamber music 
playing and to enable them to gain a comprehensive and 
practical knowledge of chamber music repertoire. 

ORCHESTRA PLAYING 

Realizing the shortage in the United States of players of 
woodwind, brass and percussion instruments qualified to 
hold posts in the many symphony orchestras scattered 
throughout the country, which condition exists in the string 
instrument field as well, The Curtis Institute of Music under- 
takes the training of orchestra players, believing that such 
preparation, which develops by way of artistic discipline and 
fosters a general musical education, also provides an artistic 
and professional outlet for the future. 

ACCOMPANYING 

Accompanying as a profession has been much neglected, 
although the field is remunerative and full of opportunity 
for those who will make it their life work. In its way as 
much an art as solo playing, requiring a thorough musician- 
ship and pianistic ability, accompanying demands of students 
a singleness of purpose and a faithfulness to their work. 
The Division provides the necessary training and experience 
through specific instruction and manifold opportunities for 
students to apply and perfect what they acquire by their 
studies, through the co-operation of the Vocal, Instrumental 
and Chamber Music Divisions. 

I 64I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OPERA 

The Department of Opera at The Curtis Institute of Music 
provides vocal students with the training necessary for an 
operatic career. Besides a thorough course in opera reper- 
toire, operatic acting and rhythmic movements, students are 
given, when sufficiently advanced in their studies, appear- 
ances in professional grand opera performances by the 
Philadelphia Grand Opera Company, which is affiliated 
with The Curtis Institute of Music. 

This opportunity of acquiring practical experience while 
still under the guidance of their instructors is of great value. 

CAMPANOLOGY (Bells) 

The Curtis Institute of Music offers a course of instruction 
in carillon playing to advanced organ students and sends a 
limited number to study with Anton Brees for a period of six 
weeks, at the Mountain Lake Singing Tower, in Mountain 
Lake, Florida. 

The Singing Tower is the creation of the late Edward W. 
Bok, who housed in it a set of seventy-one bells of beautiful 
tone and perfect pitch, and who gave the use of the bells to 
students of The Curtis Institute of Music enrolled for the 
study of Campanology. 

Students learn the rudiments of bell playing on a practice 
clavier in the Tower and are allowed to play the actual bells 
when their progress has warranted such promotion. An- 
other practice clavier is installed in one of the studios of the 
Institute. 

PROFESSIONAL CRITICISM 

The course is designed to equip students for the career of 
Professional Criticism. With an eminent music critic as 
instructor, and with a complete theoretic and an adequate 
academic faculty, together with manifold opportunities for 
students to hear music, The Curtis Institute believes its 
facilities for intensive training in this field are unique. 

I 65! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Living Accommodations 

Upon request, the Student Counselor will advise students 
and assist them in obtaining suitable living accommodations. 

A scale of rentals and any further information regarding 
rooms may be obtained through the Office of the Counselor. 

Practice Facilities at The Curtis Institute 

For practice purposes, the Institute has studios equipped 
with Steinway pianos, one studio with a three-manual 
Aeolian practice organ, and one studio with a practice clavier 
for students of Campanology. 

Health Measures 

The Institute has appointed physicians for recommenda- 
tion to students in case of illness. 

The use of a gymnasium and natatorium has been arranged 
for the students during the school year. 

Dining Room 

Home-cooked meals are served at cost. Students and 
members of the faculty meet at the same tables and thus 
become better acquainted, bridging the distance which so 
often exists between student and instructor. 



H66! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE 
EXAMINATIONS 

The entrance requirements are presented here in a general 
form, allowing the applicant latitude in the selection o£ 
works to be presented for examination. While the choice of 
compositions is important, the manner of performance carries 
far greater weight. The final decision as to the suitability of 
an applicant for acceptance rests upon the evidence of talent 
shown in the examination, rather than upon the degree of 
advancement already attained. Admission is limited to 
those applicants whose natural musical talent gives promise 
of development to a point of artistic achievement. Selec- 
tion from among the applicants is made by competitive elim- 
ination. The examiners do not assume the obligation of 
hearing all that an applicant is required to have in readiness 
for examination. 



VOICE 

The applicant must possess an exceptionally good voice, 
health, vitality, musical talent and personality. In addi- 
tion, the applicant should have at least an elementary 
knowledge of music and of pianoforte, while some knowledge 
of languages is very desirable. 

Four selections from operatic arias, oratorios or songs, 
showing the range and power of the voice, should be sub- 
mitted from memory. The selections should be chosen from 
the works of the following composers: Parisotti, Handel, 
Schubert, Schumann, Franz, Brahms, Strauss, Tschaikowsky, 
Rachmaninoff, Faure, Debussy, Duparc, Mozart, Bizet, 
Saint-Saens, Puccini, or Wagner. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-three years of age. 

H67I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PIANOFORTE 

Applicants must play from memory a Three-part Invention 
or a Prelude and Fugue from The Well-Tempered Clavichord 
of Bach; a Beethoven sonata, complete; two selections — one 
slow and one brilliant — from the works of Chopin or Schu- 
mann (preferably Chopin). 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

VIOLIN 

Applicants should have a precise knowledge of the posi- 
tions and the change of positions, double notes, and a com- 
plete command of scales and the usual ways of bowing. 
They should be able to play selected studies from Kreutzer, 
Rode and Fiorillo, and one of more concertos from the 
works of the following composers : de Beriot, Viotti, Spohr, 
or Vieuxtemps. Selections should be submitted from 
memory. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

VIOLA 

Applicants must have some knowledge of the clefs, the posi- 
tions, scales and arpeggios; and be familiar with some of the 
standard violin studies such as those of Kreutzer, Rode, and 
also Campagnoli's 41 Caprices, Opus 2.2., which are especially 
written for the viola. They should also be able to play one 
movement of Firket's or Hans Sitt's Concertos. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-five years of age. 

VIOLONCELLO 

Applicants must be able to play satisfactorily all major and 
minor scales and arpeggios; also, a fast and a slow movement 
from a Bach Suite. They may choose for a second com- 
position one movement of a concerto from the standard 
repertoire or one movement from a sonata for piano and 
violoncello, classical or modern. It is desirable, but not 
obligatory, that selections be submitted from memory. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

168 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CHAMBER MUSIC PLAYING 

Applicants must possess a good ear, be able to read fluently 
at sight from standard works of chamber music, and show 
command of the instrument of their selection. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

ACCOMPANYING 

Applicants must demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability to 
play satisfactorily some of the more difficult studies of 
Cramer, Clementi-Tausig, or Czerny, Opus 740; be able to 
read at sight, with a certain degree of accuracy, such accom- 
paniments as the Examiners may choose, and have a fair 
knowledge of the standard violin, 'cello and song literature. 

HARP 

Applicants should possess a knowledge of the principles of 
modern harp playing and be familiar with its "fundamental 
position" and "symbols". Knowledge of piano playing is 
desirable. Applicants should submit from memory two 
works of contemporary composers and two transcriptions 
from the classics. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

ORGAN 

The following should be submitted from memory: (a) 
Fugue or principal movement from a sonata or symphony, 
(b) a trio and (c) a slow movement. 

Applicants must also play the following on the pianoforte: 
(a) a study, (b) a nocturne or other slow movement. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-three years of age. 

CAMPANOLOGY (Belli) 

Applicants (preferably men) must be able to play the organ 
and should have a thorough knowledge of harmony, being 
able to read music easily and to transpose a composition at 
sight. They must be at ease at the keyboard, and should 
possess a sound physique, as the playing of bells is a stren- 
uous art. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

I 69! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PROFESSIONAL CRITICISM 

Applicants must have a thorough knowledge of harmony, 
counterpoint, musical form, instrumentation and an elemen- 
tary knowledge of pianoforte playing. They should possess a 
college education or its equivalent and show marked literary 
ability. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

COMPOSITION 

Applicants must send their manuscripts by registered mail 
for examination, presenting themselves in person only when 
so requested by the Institute. All manuscripts must be in the 
handwriting of the applicant. 

Only such manuscripts as show genuine creative ability 
will be considered. 

OPERA 

Applicants must possess a good voice and be well advanced 
in the art of singing. They should give evidence of a musical 
background, general musicianship, and some knowledge of 
opera repertoire. They must be able easily to read music 
at sight. A knowledge of languages is desirable. 

They should have a good stage presence and sound 
physique. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

ORCHESTRA PLAYING 

Applicants must possess an elementary knowledge of 
music, a good ear, a good sense of rhythm, be able to read 
at sight, and show talent and aptitude for the instrument 
of their selection. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

CONDUCTING 

Applicants must possess a working knowledge of clefs and 
transposition, a good ear, a fair knowledge of the piano, 
organ or a string instrument, and adequate theoretic prep- 
aration. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

I 7o! 



PHYSICAL EQUIPMENT 



I 71 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



BUILDINGS AND LOCATION 

Occupying three fine old remodelled residences facing the 
green of Rittenhouse Square, The Curtis Institute of Music 
is in the heart of the best residential section of Philadelphia. 
It is within four blocks of the Academy of Music where the 
symphony concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the con- 
certs of important visiting artists and the performances of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company of New York and the Phila- 
delphia Grand Opera Company are given. 

Casimir Hall 

Casimir Hall has a seating capacity of 300, and adjoins the 
main building of the school. The interior walls, of white 
mahogany, are panelled up to the domed ceiling. The illum- 
ination is effected by indirect lighting. 

The concert organ, a four-manual Aeolian, is used for 
students' lessons as well as for concerts. 

A proscenium elevator facilitates the placing on the stage 
of pianos that are stored on the floor below. 

In this hall students acquire experience in performing 
before an audience under conditions similar to those which 
they will encounter later in professional life. 

Library 

The library consists of 18,42.1 volumes — books, music and 
scores. It includes many original and unedited editions of 
music of the great masters. Also it embraces a generous col- 
lection of Victor, Columbia, Brunswick, Edison, Odeon, 
Polydor and Gramaphonic records, as well as Duo- Art rolls. 
An interesting feature is a collection of Stereographs, the 
pictures being used by the academic tutors in their work. 
The late Dr. Lynnwood Farnam bequeathed his entire organ 
library, consisting of books, music and original manuscripts, 
to The Curtis Institute of Music. This collection has been 
added to the library. 

I J 2 -! 





= o 



< ™ 

(J «J 




CORNER OF RECEPTION HALL 



RECEPTION HALL 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE COLLECTION OF 

INSTRUMENTS FOR THE USE OF 

CURTIS INSTITUTE STUDENTS 



OLD INSTRUMENTS 

VIOLINS 

Nicolaus Amati Cremona 

Januarius Gagliano Naples 1751 

Niccolo Gagliano Naples 1709 

Niccolo Gagliano Naples 1716 

Francesco Goffriller Udine 17x5 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Milano 1753 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Milano 1755 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Parma 1764 

Pietro Guarnerius Venice 1750 

Carlo Ferdinando Landolphus .... Milano 1753 

Nicolas Lupot Paris 1813 

Nicolas Lupot Paris circa 1800 

Nicolas Lupot Paris 

Gaspar Lorenzini Placentiae 1784 

Pique Paris 1793 

Pique (three-quarter size) Paris 

Pietro Giacomo Rogeri Brescia 1700 

Laurentius Storioni Cremona 1784 

Antonius Stradivarius Cremona 1697 

Carl Antonio Testori Milano 17x9 

Jean Baptiste Vuillaume Paris 

VIOLAS 

Antonius and Hieronymous Amati . . Cremona 161 6 

Gasparo da Salo Brescia 1570 

Gasparo da Salo Brescia, end of 

1 6th century 

VIOLONCELLOS 

Tomasso Ballestrieri Mantua 1765 

Matteo Goffriller Venice, early 

1 8th century 

Giovanni Grancino Milano 1704 

Jean Baptiste Vuillaume Paris 1840-18 50 



I 75 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OLD INSTRUMENTS, continued 

DOUBLE BASSES 

Amati Italian School 

Baldontoni Italian School 

Carcassi Italian School 

Carcassi Italian School 

Cavallini Italian School 

Darches Paris i8zo 

Gagliano Italian School 

Gagliano Italian School 

Piatellini Italian School 

Raffo Italian School 

Storioni Italian School 

D. Tecchler Italian School 

BOWS 

Violin 

Charles Peccatte (silver) Paris 18x5 

Charles Peccatte (silver) Paris i8z6 

Charles Peccatte (silver) Paris 18x7 

Dominic Peccatte (gold) 
Peccatte (silver) 

Lamy, le pere (silver) Paris 1899 

Lamy, le pere (silver) 

Lupot (silver) Paris 18 10 

Lupot (silver) Paris i8iz 

NlJRNBERGER 

Pfretzschner 
Pfretzschner 
Pfretzschner 
Sartory (silver) 

Silvertre Maucotel (gold) Paris 1898 

Tourte (ivory frog) 
Tourte (gold; tortoise frog) 
Tourte, Aine (silver) 
Tourte, le jeune (silver) 
Tourte, Francois (tortoise frog) 
Vigneron 

Voirin (silver) i860 

Voirin (silver) 
Gold 

I76I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OLD INSTRUMENTS, continued 

BOWS — continued 
Viola 



Dobb (silver). 
Charles Peccatte (silver) 
Dominic Peccatte (silver) 
Vuillaume (silver) 



Violoncello 

Lupot (silver) Paris 1808 

Dominic Peccatte (silver) Paris 18x6 

Simon (silver) Paris 182.7 

Voirin (silver) Pans 1856 

Voirin (silver) Paris 1865 



l77l 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



MODERN INSTRUMENTS 

12. Violins 14 Violas 

3 Violoncellos 3 Double Basses 

BOWS 

1 Violin i Violoncello 

15 Viola 4 Double Bass 

PIANOS 

■l Steinway Concert Grands 6 Steinway Uprights 

5 1 Steinway Grands i Duo- Art Grand 



HARPS 

1 Lyon and Healy Concert Grand 
15 Lyon and Healy Practice 



WOODWIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS 



H78! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



WORKS OF ART 

Believing that the study of one form of Art is stimulated 
by an appreciation of another, and that environment plays an 
important part in education, The Curtis Institute of Music 
seeks to provide an atmosphere that will furnish this subtle 
influence. Within its buildings are paintings, etchings, 
lithographs and watercolors, by eminent artists of the past 
and the present, sculpture, tapestries, Oriental rugs, antique 
furniture and fine wrought iron pieces. 

On the walls are some forty paintings, by George Wharton 
Edwards, Emil Carlsen, Childe Hassam, George Inness, Jr., 
W. L. Metcalf, Elmer Schofield, Frederick J. Waugh, Paul 
King, Hovsep Pushman, Ralph Albert Blakelock, and other 
contemporary artists, as well as a few older works including 
two flower pieces by Jean Baptiste Monnoyer, a portrait of 
the Countess of Carlisle by Sir Peter Lely, and a predella 
panel of the Umbrian School. Etchings include the very 
fine "Joseph Conrad Listening to Music", by Muirhead Bone, 
and one of James McBey's best works, entitled "The Pianist", 
besides portraits of Beethoven, Wagner and Paderewski, by 
Emil Orlik, Jacques Reich and Emil Fuchs respectively. 
There are also some Fantin-Latour lithographs, Wagnerian in 
inspiration, and a charming watercolor sketch of Chopin by 
his friend Kwiatkowsky. 

The finest piece of sculpture is a bronze head of Beethoven 
by Emile Antoine Bourdelle. There are also a bas relief 
portrait of Edward MacDowell by Helen Farnsworth Mears, 
and a bronze group by Benjamin Turner Kurtz entitled 
"Music", besides statuettes by Ary Bitter and Edward 
Berge. 

The tapestries include three antique Oudenarde pieces, while 
some old Beauvais and Brussels fragments are used as chair 
covers. 

The iron door, entrance to Casimir Hall, is by Samuel 
Yellin. 

I79l 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PUBLIC APPEARANCES 

OF 

CURTIS INSTITUTE STUDENTS 
1930-1931 

Carrying out the policy of -providing public appearances for 
students , the Institute scheduled the following activities: 

Concerts by The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, with artist- 
students as soloists, at: 

The Academy of Music, Philadelphia (The Phila- 
delphia Forum), on January 2.8, 193 1 

Lyric Theatre, Baltimore, Maryland, on February 
8, 193 1 

Constitution Hall, Washington, D. C, on February 

9> 193 ! , . 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, on 

February 2.3, 193 1 

William Penn Auditorium, Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, on May 9, 193 1 

The Academy of Music, Philadelphia, on May 16, 
193 1 

Twenty-four concerts before sixteen educational and civic 
groups in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Mary- 
land, by students of Voice, Piano, Accompanying, Violin, 
Harp, Chamber Music, Flute and Organ 

Twenty weekly concerts broadcast to radio audiences by 
The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, and students of Voice, 
Piano, Accompanying, Organ, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, 
Chamber Music and Orchestra Playing 

A series of five chamber music concerts in the Pennsylvania 
Museum of Art at Fairmount, Philadelphia, by the Swastika 
Quartet and other groups composed of students of Chamber 
Music, Orchestra Playing, Voice and Organ 

I80I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PUBLIC APPEARANCES, continued 

Six concerts by the Swastika Quartet, at Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; for the Barnwqll Foundation of 
the Central High School, Philadelphia; at the Cosmopolitan 
Club, Philadelphia; before the Chamber Music Association, 
Philadelphia (two performances); and at Portland, Maine, 
with the Portland Men's Singing Club; besides an appearance 
in the Foyer of The Academy of Music, Philadelphia, as 
assisting artists 

Three concerts by the Casimir Quartet, at the Art Alliance, 
Philadelphia; at the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia; 
and before the Chamber Music Association, Philadelphia 

Besides the foregoing, there were numerous other student activities. 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, substituting for the 
Philharmonic Orchestra of New York, broadcast by special 
request two two-hour length programs, with artist-students 
as soloists. 

Twenty-six students of Voice and Opera participated as 
soloists in seventeen of the eighteen performances of grand 
opera given by the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company. 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra played the orchestra parts 
of the performances of "Gianni Schicchi\ "Rigoletto" and 
"Faust^ by the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company. 

An artist-student of Conducting conducted two of the 
performances of the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company. 

Fifty members of The Curtis Symphony Orchestra partici- 
pated in the Mozart Festival held on May 7 and 8 in Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, under the direction of Ward-Stephens. 

Five students of Voice participated as soloists in the same 
Festival. 

Five graduates — Henri Temianka, violinist; Shura Cher- 
kassky, pianist; Tibor de Machula, violoncellist; Benjamin 
Grobani, baritone; Earl Fox, accompanist — made concert 
tours of Europe. 

Henri Temianka and Benjamin Grobani also concertized 
in the United States, their accompanists being Yvonne 
Krinsky and Theodore Saidenberg, respectively. 

I 81! 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CONCERTS OF THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

1930-193 1 

The following works were played: 

Berlioz Overture — ' 'A Roman Carnival 

Brahms Symphony No. z, in D major 

Conus Concerto in E minor for Violin and Orchestra 

Debussy Prelude a "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune" 

Nocturne — ' 'Fetes" 

Faure Requiem for Soli, Chorus, Organ and Orchestra 

Gluck Aria — "Diane impitoyable" from "Iphigenie en 

Aulide", for Baritone and Orchestra 

Leoncavallo Aria — "Vesti la giubba" from "Pagliacci", for 

Tenor and Orchestra 

Mendelssohn Concerto in E minor for Violin and Orchestra 

(First Movement) 

Ponchielli Aria — "Suicidio" from "La Gioconda", for 

Soprano and Orchestra 

Puccini Aria — "Si, mi chiamano Mimi" from "La 

Boheme", for Soprano and Orchestra 

Rachmaninov Symphonic Poem — "Die Toteninsel" 

Rubinstein Concerto in D minor for Piano and Orchestra 

(First Movement) 

Smetana Overture to "The Bartered Bride" 

Strauss Symphonic Tone-Poem — "Don Juan" 

Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche 

Tschaikowsky Concerto in D major, for Violin and Orchestra 

(First Movement) 
Concerto in B flat minor for Piano and Orchestra 

(First Movement) 
Overture-Fantasy — "Romeo and Juliet" 
Recitative and Aria — "Adieu, Forets" from 
"Jeanne d'Arc", for Contralto and Orchestra 
Wagner Aria — "Einsam in Truben Tagen" from "Lohen- 
grin", for Soprano and Orchestra 
Aria — "O du mein holder abendstern" from 

"Tannhauser", for Baritone and Orchestra 
Overture to "Rienzi" 
Prelude to "Die Meistersinger" 

Williams A London Symphony 

The conductors were: Emil Mlynarski, Dr. Louis Bailly, Sylvan Levin, 
Louis Vyner and * Ward -Stephens. 

* Director of the Mozart Festival, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

182.1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CONCERTS OF CHAMBER MUSIC 

THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART, 

FAIRMOUNT, PHILADELPHIA 



The following works 
Bach 



Beethoven 
Brahms . 



Debussy . . 
Dvorak . 
Faure . . 

Mendelssohn 
Mozart . 

Poulenc 

Schubert . 



Sibelius . . 
Taneiev . , 

TsCHAIKOWSKY 
ZlLCHER 



I93O-I93 I 

were played: 
Sixth Brandenburg Concerto in B flat major, for 

Violas with accompaniment of Violoncelli and 

Double Basses (Organ obligato by Gevaert) 
String Quartet in E minor, Opus 59, Number 2. 
String Quintet in B minor, Opus 115, for Two Violins , 

Two Violas and Violoncello 
Vier Ernste Gesange, Opus 12.1, for Male Voice and 

Piano 
String Quartet in G minor, Opus 10 
String Quartet in F major, Opus 96 
Requiem for Soli, Chorus, Organ and Orchestra 

(First secular performance in America) 

Octet in E flat major, Opus 2.0, for Strings 
Quintet in E flat major, for Piano, Oboe, Clarinet, 

Horn and Bassoon, Kochel 4^7. 
Rapsodie negre for Voice, Piano, Flute, Clarinet and 

String Quartet 
Octet in F major, Opus 166, for Clarinet, Bassoon, 

Horn, Two Violins, Viola, Violoncello and Double 

Bass 
Conzonetta, Opus 6ia, for String Orchestra 
Quartet in E major, Opus xo, for Piano, Violin, Viola 

and Violoncello 
Sextet for Strings, Opus 70 (Souvenir de Florence) 
"The Song of Solomon" — Variations for Contralto 

and Baritone, Piano and String Quartet 



STUDENTS' CONCERTS GIVEN AT CASIMIR HALL 

1930-193 1 

Twenty-six programs were presented by students in Pianoforte, Voice, 
Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Harp, Double Bass, Wind Ensemble and 
Chamber Music. As part of this schedule, the Ten Sonatas of Ludwig 
van Beethoven, for Violin and Piano, were played, in three concerts. 

STUDENTS' OPERATIC CONCERTS 
THEATRE "PLAYS AND PLAYERS" PHILADELPHIA 

1930-193 1 

Three concerts consisting of acts and scenes from "Aida", "The Bartered 
Bride" , ' 'Carmen ' , ' 'Cavalleria Rusticana' ' , ' 'Faust' ' , ' 'Lohengrin' ' , ' 'Madama 
Butterfly" , "Martha", "Le No%(e di Figaro" , and "Pagliacci" were given, 
in costume and with appropriate setting, by students of Voice and Opera. 
Thirty members of The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, conducted by a 
student of Conducting, provided the accompaniment for seven numbers, 
and the piano for the remaining seven. 

II 83 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FACULTY RECITALS 

Given at 
CASIMIR HALL 



November 17, 1930 

November 2.4, 1930 

December 9, 1930 
December 16, 1930 
January 8, 193 1 
January 12., 193 1 
January 19, 193 1 
March 2., 193 1 

April 30, 193 1 

May i2_, 193 1 



1930-1931 

*Miss Harriet van Emden, Soprano 
J Miss Lucile LawrenceI jt 
|Mr. Carlos Salzedo J ^ 

Mr. Mieczyslaw Munz, Pianist 
Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist 
Mr. Abram Chasins, Pianist-Composer 
Mr. Horatio Connell, Baritone 
*Mr. Felix S almond, Violoncellist 
*Mr. Efrem Zimbalist, Violinist 
( Madame Isabelle Vengerova, Pianist 
1 Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist 
[Mr. Felix S almond, Violoncellist 
Mr. Josef Hofmann, Pianist 

*Mr. Harry Kaufman at the Piano 



March 11, 193 1 
March 16, 193 1 
March 2.4, 1931 



O/iw Events 

CASIMIR HALL 

1930-1931 

. Concert by The Musical Art Quartet, 
assisted by Mr. Harry Kaufman 

. Lecture on "Music Criticism" by 
Mr. Oscar Thompson 

. Lecture "The Musician and His 
Audience' 'by Mr. Henry Bellamann 



II 84I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDENTS ARE FROM THE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES 



CHINA 

ENGLAND 

FRANCE 



GERMANY 
HUNGARY 
ITALY 



RUSSIA 



Alabama 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kansas 

Kentucky 



THE UNITED STATES 

(31 states) 



Louisiana 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Missouri 
Nebraska 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
Wisconsin 



Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Texas 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 



CUBA 



PORTO RICO 



BERMUDA 



HAWAII 



Alberta 



CANADA 
Ontario 



Quebec 



MEXICO 



85 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CALENDAR 

For the School Year 1931-1931 

School Year begins .... Monday, September 2.8, 193 1 
School Year ends Saturday, May 2.8, 1932. 

Holidays 

Thanksgiving Thursday, November 16, 193 1 

Christmas Vacation 

December 2.0, 193 1 to January 3, 1932. (both inclusive) 

Washington's Birthday . . Monday, February 2.x, 1932. 

Easter Vacation 

March 15 to April 3, 1932. (both inclusive) 



Albert Petersen 

Official Photographer 

New York - Philadelphia 



I 86 1 




Kasfi 



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